King on ‘books’…

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The King

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Wicked Stephen King Art Print ($10 USD) from Bangorfest! Check this out!

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Hidden in this amazing artwork are references to 21 Stephen King books and stories. Can you find them all?

This limited-edition 11″x17″, hand-signed print by artist Mortimer Glum, comes with a diagram showing all the hidden King references. The print was created for a recent Bangorefest appearance in Stephen King’s hometown of Bangor, Maine, and we’re now offering it online for the first time.

Get yours before they’re gone!

Click here for more information…

M. R. James–Master of the English Ghost Story, a Must-See Documentary!

I love this sexy man (HailThe9) & his book reviews…and his accent…

Here are more of his reviews…

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx8YC9pwwfpQDqeDt2vVTQ/videos?sort=dd&view=0&shelf_id=0

 

Adding Diversity, Equality & Compassion to H. P. Lovecraft’s “Mythos” & “Lovecraftian” – Style Fiction …

Haint-Blue Shudders


Hello from Lovecraft Country!

You know I can’t stay away. And neither can you. We are endlessly fascinated with him and his weirdness, his…oddity.

I’m always spending time here in Lovecraft Country. All of that “when you stare into the abyss, it stares back into you” stuff just thrills me. I’m a weirdo.  And I’m a proud one.

The Gist

On this outing, I have brought back dripping and smelling like seaweed…a couple of pretty cool treasures to share with you: they are two anthologies I swam by that are putting ethnicity and diversity into the ongoing mythos…the prickly “Lovecraftiana” that is like an ugly beauty mark on the face of American fiction.

The “Lovecraft Mythos” (aka. rather erroneously as the “Cthulhu Mythos”) and “Lovecraftian” horror (refer to links below under Further Reading), have been associated since the turn of the twentieth century with the fictional (and now…

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On the Supenatural in Poetry by 18th-Century Gothic Author Ann Radcliffe

Pether, Sebastian, 1790-1844; Moonlit Lake with a Ruined Gothic Church, a Church and Boatmen

Painting by David Wright, Oil on Canvas, ca. 1892. (Public Domain)

On the Supernatural in Poetry*

Anne Radcliffe (The Mysteries of Udolpho)

[*First appeared in the New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Vol. 16, no. 1, 1826 (pp. 145-152)]

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Credited as the first true Gothic novel, and the one which set the standard for those that would follow. (Dover)

One of our travellers began a grave dissertation on the illusions of the imagination. “And not only on frivolous occasions,” said he, “but in the most important pursuits of life, an object often flatters and charms at a distance, which vanishes into nothing as we approach it; and ’tis well if it leave only disappointment in our hearts. Sometimes a severer monitor is left there.”

These truisms, delivered with an air of discovery by Mr. S––, who seldom troubled himself to think upon any subject, except that of a good dinner, were lost upon his companion, who, pursuing the airy conjectures which the present scene, however humbled, had called up, was following Shakspeare into unknown regions. “Where is now the undying spirit,” said he, “that could so exquisitely perceive and feel?–that could inspire itself with the va,rious characters of this world, and create worlds of its own; to which the grand and the beautiful, the gloomy and the sublime of visible Nature, up-called not only corresponding feelings, but passions ; which seemed to perceive a soul in every thing: and thus, in the secret workings of its own characters, and in the combinations of its incidents, kept the elements and local scenery always in unison with them, heightening their effect. So the conspirators at Rome pass under the fiery showers and sheeted lightning of the thunder-storm, to meet, at midnight, in the porch of Pompey’s theatre. The streets being then deserted by the affrighted multitude, that place, open as it was, was convenient for their council; and, as to the storm, they felt it not; it was not more terrible to them than their own passions, nor so terrible to others as the dauntless spirit that makes them, almost unconsciously, brave its fury. These appalling circumstances, with others of supernatural import, attended the fall of the conqueror of the world–a man, whose power Cassius represents to be dreadful as this night, when the sheeted dead were seen in the lightning to glide along the streets of Rome. How much does the sublimity of these attendant circumstances heighten our idea of the power of Caesar, of the terrific grandeur of his character, and prepare and interest us for his fate. The whole soul is roused and fixed, in the full energy of attention, upon the progress of the conspiracy against him; and, had not Shakespeare wisely withdrawn him from our view, there would have been no balance of our passions.”–” Caesar was a tyrant,” said Mr. S––. W–– looked at him for a moment, and smiled, and then silently resumed the course of his own thoughts. No master ever knew how to touch the accordant springs of sympathy by small circumstances like our own Shakspeare. In Cymbeline, for instance, how finely such circumstances are made use of, to awaken, at once, solemn expectation and tenderness, and, by recalling the softened remembrance of a sorrow long past, to prepare the mind to melt at one that was approaching, mingling at the same time, by means of a mysterious occurrence, a slight tremour of awe with our pity. Thus, when Belarius and Arviragus return to the cave where they had left the unhappy and worn-out Imogen to repose, while they are yet standing before it, and Arviragus, speaking of her with tenderest pity, as “the poor sick Fidele,” goes out to enquire for her,–solernn music is heard from the cave, sounded by that harp of which Guiderius says, “Since the death of my dearest mother, it did not speak before. All solemn things should answer solemn accidents.” Immediately Arviragus enters with Fidele senseless in his arms…

“The bird is dead, that we have made so much of.
–How found you him?
Stark, as you see, thus smiling.
–I thought he slept, and put
My clouted brogues from off my feet, whose rudeness
Answered my steps too loud.”–”Why he but sleeps!”

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