Dating My Wardrobe: Somewhere in Time on Mackinac Island

Love her! Witty, smart, fun, a good writer. I think you’ll enjoy this blog!

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It’s July 2018, and I’m in love with my vintage wardrobe. Having given-up on finding romance with human beings, I looked to my closet for love. Moths, broken hangers and all! Now, this may sound like a rather depressing thing to say. You may be thinking, how can a girl be so love lorn that she’s reduced to forming amorous attachments with forty year-old hot pants!? However, my vintage wardrobe is exciting. They weather every turn with me. They are chivalrous protectors against the elements. And–unless I’ve eaten too many carnitas enchiladas with cheese– my wardrobe is always a perfect fit!

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Well, as I embark on this serious relationship with my wardrobe, I try to think of a good place to take my 1970s high waisted pants, and 1970s crop top. In the spirit of time travel and true love, I settle upon a trip to one of my favorite…

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What is MK-ULTRA? Welcome to “Stranger Things”…

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Here’s the rundown on the infamous CIA Mind Control program that you need to know about.

I just started watching the Netflix series Stranger Things. I don’t know why I’m coming so late to this party. It’s a stellar show with an amazing cast and writing that’s way cool.

By episode three, though, you gotta have noticed MK-ULTRA I don’t know about you but I sure am tired of learning about new ways our government—and its cronies—have been hiding things from us—decades and decades and decades of secret after secret after secret—many of which are designed specifically to hurt Americans individually and as a people. And we call ourselves a “free” nation.

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Certain people will automatically call you a ‘Conspiracy Theorist’ when they hear words like ‘Deep State’ or ‘Secret CIA Operation’. This is by design and it plays right into why it’s important for you to educate yourself on this topic.

The MK-ULTRA program is a stain—more like a bruise—no, a festering wound—on our history that needs to be told from generation to generation. The proof of its existence was nearly all destroyed by Richard Helm, Head of the CIA, while the Watergate scandal was unfolding. That is why it is rarely talked about and you won’t find it in your History books.

Several thousand documents have been declassified and made public through FOIA. These documents are available in the CIA’s online library. Some of which were released as recently as December 2016.

So, What the Hell Is MK-ULTRA?

The United States was determined to figure out how to enslave someone’s mind in order to have them carry out nefarious acts upon receiving a ‘trigger’ such as a verbal command or seeing an image.

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Reblog: The Black Monk of Pontefract, Yorkshire—The True Story of England’s “Most Haunted” Poltergeist Incident!

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A decade before the world famous Amityville, New York, and Enfield, England poltergeist cases came to public attention, a little heard of, but acknowledged as Europe’s most violent haunting, took place in the town of Pontefract, Yorkshire.

Number 30 East Drive, on the Chequerfields Estate, East Yorkshire, stood on a corner at the top of a hill, close to what was once the site of the town gallows. Living at number 30 were Jean and Joe Pritchard; their son Philip, aged 15; and their daughter Diane, aged 12.

The poltergeist, later to become known as the Black Monk of Pontefract, began disturbing the Pritchard family in 1966 with a wide variety of paranormal activity. Water pools, lights turning off and on again, furniture overturning, pictures being slashed, objects flying or levitating, knocking sounds, objects disappearing and appearing again, foul smells, farmyard noises, heavy breathing sounds, sudden drops of temperature, and a mysterious black-robed figure, whose appearances became more and more frequent were all reported at the house!

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via Reblog: The Black Monk of Pontefract, Yorkshire—The True Story of England’s “Most Haunted” Poltergeist Incident!

Reblog: Lovecraft & the Occult…

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The Horror Within by “pigboom” (Reddit).

You know I’m a huge fan of everything “Lovecraftian”. As I read more and more into the occult, what it means, its sources, the culture surrounding it, I realize that many of our greatest writers—from Arthur Machen, to Algernon Blackwood, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to Howard Phillips Lovecraft—wrote about subjects steeped in the idea of forbidden knowledge, that which is “hidden”—which is what the term “occult” really means.

Here is a brief yet fascinating look at occult elements in the work of Lovecraft. Read on worshippers, read on!

Lovecraft & the Occult

A major component of cosmic horror in general, and of Lovecraft’s work in particular, is the element of the occult. In many ways, Lovecraft’s occult aspects are true to the origins of the word: much of what various characters in his stories seek is that which remains hidden or concealed from view. By uncovering and practicing secret rituals and speaking ancient words, these characters reveal powerful knowledge and cosmic truths, both awesome and terrifying in their implications and scope. For decades, scholars have explored Lovecraft’s real-life connections to the occult, based on his fiction, his correspondence, and his personal life, in order to unravel whether he had some truly esoteric link to realms beyond ours, or was simply an imaginative dreamer from Providence. He may very well have been a little of both.

Above: Lovecraft’s “Elder Sign” in Various Manifestations (Pinterest).

Lovecraft’s correspondence with others in his circle of friends suggests that, while he was well-read on the subject, he was not a personal practitioner of magick.6 Much of his knowledge of the occult seems to have come from books on European witchcraft, written by people outside those witch-groups and colored by the perceptions of non-Christian religions during his time, as well as colonial American witchcraft, as described by witch hunters of Salem like Cotton Mather.6 Some of these latter sources contain alleged accounts from accused witches, although the credibility and interpretation of such accounts would necessarily be, at best, somewhat questionable.

A movement toward freer expression of religion in the 1970s has given us some insight, however, into magickal systems. We have come to see that while some of the details of actual occult practice, both modern and traditional, are often misrepresented in Lovecraft’s work, there is much that Lovecraft incorporates that is, surprisingly, close enough to give actual practitioners pause. An examination of the specific words used by Lovecraft suggests that he was not intimately aware of actual occult practices for raising demons or demonic gods, since his language in the rituals more closely resembles protective spells, which include the invocation of various names of the Judao-Christian God (or slightly altered versions of those names), such as Hel, Heloym, Emmanvel, Tetragrammaton, and Iehova, as well as names of archangels, such as Sother and Saboth, referenced in “The Horror at Red Hook” (2, 6). These names are generally used in protective sigils by practitioners of magick against entities summoned against their will for service or information. Such usage would seem counterproductive in the raising of those entities themselves.

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Reblog: ‘Today’s Problem With Masculinity Isn’t What You Think—A Former Soldier Explains the Emotional Vacancy of the “Fatherless Generation”’ …

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via Reblog: ‘Today’s Problem With Masculinity Isn’t What You Think—A Former Soldier Explains the Emotional Vacancy of the “Fatherless Generation”’ …