All the (stupid) Gender-normative bullsheist aside—you KNOW you have a fantasy in the noggin storeroom w that 70’s Tom-of-Finland mustache! (to quote Mccauley Caulkin: “We ALL do!”)

Rock on brother. Rock. On.



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FYI: The art of “Tom of Finland” ca. 1970s (tumblr).

“…the ❤️’s home…”

“My heart found its home long ago in the beauty, mystery, order and disorder of the flowering earth.”

Lady Bird Johnson

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“Our Lady of the Flowering Earth” by Shiloh Sophia McCloud (artist website: http://www.shilohsophiastudios.com/flowering-earth/ )

“Hey, anyone remember that old TV show, Candle Cove?”

Mike Painter: “I was wondering if I could take a look at those files.”

Sheriff: “May I ask why? It’s been 28 years since they dragged those kids out of the woods.”

Mike Painter: “Yeah. Missing all their teeth.”


Will Wiles of Aeon wrote that Candle Cove was “among the best creepypastas out there” and a good example of using the messageboard and forum format as a storytelling tactic. The Verge has written praise for the creepypasta, stating that it was “a perfectly dark spin on our nostalgia for the half-remembered stories of our childhood, that realization that the things we liked as kids were much, much creepier than we thought.” It was made into the Channel Zero SYFY-Channel series in 2016.

Read about Creepypastas, here:

https://io9.gizmodo.com/is-creepypasta-a-form-of-folklore-1495902436

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“Then Why Call Him God?”

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Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing?
Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing?
Then why call him God?

– Epicurus, Greek Philosopher (341–270 BCE)

Image by Malinda Rathnayake, Flickr.

Tonight’s Read: The Queen’s Conjurer—The Science and Magic of Dr. John Dee, Adviser to Queen Elizabeth I—by Benjamin Woolley, Reviews & Links…

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“John Dee is commonly regarded as England’s finest home-grown magus, our most notable exponent of the esoteric arts that promised astonishing advances in knowledge for 16th-century Europe. His name is mentioned along with those of Paracelsus and Giordano Bruno, and he is sometimes proposed as an inspiration for Dr Faustus, Prospero or Ben Jonson’s Alchemist.“

– Graham Parry, The Guardian


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John Dee, Portrait. Date unknown (Wiki commons).

‘Dr John Dee is a Jekyll and Hyde kind of historical figure – intellectual giant or shady charlatan, depending on your point of view.

Born in 1527, when England was enjoying that flowering of art and learning we call the Renaissance, he trained with the scientist and technical instrument-maker Gemma Frisius at Louvain in the Low Countries, and went on to become a mathematician of distinction.

A personal adviser and official writer of technical “position papers” on navigational and maritime policy matters to Queen Elizabeth I, his opinion was sought by the Tudor government on investment in new technologies and projects to smelt metals.

He was a consultant to Martin Frobisher’s 1576 attempt to discover the Northwest Passage (a northerly trading route by sea to the lucrative markets in Russia and beyond), and trained Frobisher’s team of adventurers in navigational techniques. Dee’s preface to the first English-language edition of the Greek mathematician Euclid’s Elementes of Geometrie (1570), edited by Sir Henry Billingsley, is regarded as a landmark piece of writing on the applications of pure mathematics in science and technology.

Continue reading

Building Our Museums…

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(Pinterest)

A dear friend emailed this to me today. It’s so beautiful…and insightful, I wanted to share it:

“If you live long enough your home will eventually become much like a museum. There are collections of things visitors will observe with puzzlement and wonder. Others may not know the purpose or value of what you have amassed and have surrounded yourself with. Your walls and mantels are filled with an evolving gallery of loved ones, living and dead. We build our own exhibit, vacate the premises when we depart this earth and hope there are those who remember our smiles, our embraces, our handshakes, the brush of our kisses and the love we shared from the depths of our hearts. All that will remain of us is the love we share.”

– Curt Jarrell

Wild Talents

“Read a book, or look at a picture. The composer has taken a wild talent that nobody else in the world believed in; a thing that came and went and flouted and deceived him; maybe starved him; almost ruined him—and has put that damn thing to work.”

Charles Fort

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