I Came Back Haunted! Don’t Miss Stories #1, #2, #3 AND #4! in Our New Rare/Vintage Ghost Story Anthology! You have to read these!

FINALCOVERDon’t forget to read my new ghost story anthology! FOUR stories have already been posted…these are rare vintage stories by lesser-known but very high quality writers. They are among the creepiest oddly haunting stories I have ever encountered, and that’s saying a lot.

Sanguine Woods Books(sm) will be offering a full ebook in late fall 2017 that will include along with these stories, a handful of new ghost stories written in that old-fashioned vein by some of the great modern writers of ghostly fiction.

So stay tuned! And, thank you so much for your support!

Click here to read Story #1 “How Love Came to Professor Guildea” by Robert Smythe Hichens, 1900…

Click here to read Story #2 “What Did Miss Darrington See?” by Emma B. Cobb, 1881…

Click here to read Story #3 “The Woman at Seven Brothers” by Wilbur Daniel Steele, 1888…

Click here to read Story #4 “The Lianhan Shee” by Will Carleton, 1830…

Rue Morgue #176! Are You Reading It?

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INSIDE ISSUE #176

FEATURES

TWILIGHT OF THE GODS Series creators Bryan Fuller and Michael Green bring Neil Gaiman’s American Gods to network television. Plus: Vincenzo Natali on directing Crispin Glover, Dark Horse’s American Gods comic and a look back at Gaiman’s novel. By Andrea Subissati, Pedro Cabezuelo and Jess Peacock

THE GREAT AND SECRET SHOWMAN The life and legacy of cultural boogeyman Anton Szandor LaVey on the 20th anniversary of his death. Plus: the occult in fashion and a few words with 3teeth frontman Lex. By Sean Plummer, Benoit Black and Andrea Subissati

THE WONDER FEARS The Watcher in the Woods director John Hough takes us back to the Disney movie that traumatized a generation of tots. Plus: a look at Disney’s dark side. By Amy Seidman and Paul Corup

CHAINSAW AND DAVE’S CLASS REUNION Summer School’s lovable gorehounds celebrate 30 years of the characters who made being a horror fan cool. Plus: a dossier of horror devotees. By Jeff Szpirglas and Tal Zimerman

DEPARTMENTS

NOTE FROM UNDERGROUND Andrea says hello.

POST-MORTEM Letters from fans, readers and weirdos

DREADLINES News highlights, horror happenings

THE CORONER’S REPORT Weird stats, morbid facts and more

NEEDFUL THINGS Strange trinkets from our bazaar of the bizarre

CINEMACABRE The latest films, the newest DVDs and reissues feat. The Void

THE LATE-NITE ARCHIVE I Bury the Living

BOWEN’S BASEMENT The Horror of Party Beach

BLOOD IN FOUR COLOURS Comics feat. Not Drunk Enough

THE NINTH CIRCLE Book reviews feat. John Cornell’s Chalk

THE FRIGHT GALLERY The spooky works of Eric Millen

THE GORE-MET Human Pork Chop and Dr. Lamb

AUDIO DROME Music reviews feat. new album from Ghoultown

PLAY DEAD Game reviews feat. Resident Evil 7: Biohazard

CLASSIC CUT The Cat and the Canary

Source and Buying Info:

http://www.rue-morgue.com/online-store/Rue-Morgue-176-May-Jun-2017-p83323287

Story #1: “How Love Came to Professor Guildea” by Robert Smythe Hichens, from The Greatest Ghost Stories Ever Told, ed. by Sanguine Woods, 2017

How Love Came to Professor Guildea

Robert Smythe Hichens¹, 1900

“It seemed to be a human voice, and yet oddly sexless. In order to resolve his doubt he withdrew into the darkness of the curtains, ceased to watch Napoleon and simply listened with keen attention, striving to forget that he was listening to a bird, and to imagine that he was overhearing a human being in conversation. After two or three minutes’ silence the voice spoke again, and at some length, apparently repeating several times an affectionate series of ejaculations with a cooing emphasis that was unutterably mawkish and offensive. The sickliness of the voice, its falling intonations and its strange indelicacy, combined with a die-away- softness and meretricious refinement, made the Father’s flesh creep….”

Dull people often wondered how it came about that Father Murchison and Professor Frederic Guildea were intimate friends. The one was all faith, the other all skepticism. The nature of the Father was based on love. He viewed the world with an almost childlike tenderness above his long, black cassock; and his mild, yet perfectly fearless, blue eyes seemed always to be watching the goodness that exists in humanity, and rejoicing at what they saw. The Professor, on the other hand, had a hard face like a hatchet, tipped with an aggressive black goatee beard. His eyes were quick, piercing and irreverent. The lines about his small, thin-lipped mouth were almost cruel. His voice was harsh and dry, sometimes, when he grew energetic, almost soprano. It fired off words with a sharp and clipping utterance. His habitual manner was one of distrust and investigation. It was impossible to suppose that, in his busy life, he found any time for love, either of humanity in general or of an individual.

Yet his days were spent in scientific investigations which conferred immense benefits upon the world.

Both men were celibates. Father Murchison was a member of an Anglican order which forbade him to marry. Professor Guildea had a poor opinion of most things, but especially of women. He had formerly held a post as lecturer at Birmingham. But when his fame as a discoverer grew he removed to London. There, at a lecture he gave in the East End, he first met Father Murchison. They spoke a few words. Perhaps the bright intelligence of the priest appealed to the man of science, who was inclined, as a rule, to regard the clergy with some contempt. Perhaps the transparent sincerity of this devotee, full of common sense, attracted him. As he was leaving the hall he abruptly asked the Father to call on him at his house in Hyde Park Place. And the Father, who seldom went into the West End, except to preach, accepted the invitation.

“When will you come?” said Guildea.

He was folding up the blue paper on which his notes were written in a tiny, clear hand. The leaves rustled drily in accompaniment to his sharp, dry voice.

“On Sunday week I am preaching in the evening at St. Saviour’s, not far off,” said the Father.

“I don’t go to church.”

“No,” said the Father, without any accent of surprise or condemnation.

“Come to supper afterwards?”

“Thank you. I will.”

Continue reading

“You know who else loves going to the gym? Your girlfriend…” hahaha! <3

Support Gay Marriage. Seriously. The Sanguine Woods does. It is a moral and a civil rights issue. And while you are at it, enjoy this hilarious video courtesy of our boys over at College Humor!

The Maudlin Cabinet

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Cloistered by Ravelled Bones and Ruined Walls

Very Cool!

GESTALT REAL-TIME REVIEWS: Dreamcatcher of Fiction Books

To RAVEL means both to Disentangle and to Entangle.

CLOISTERED BY RAVELLED BONES AND RUINED WALLS is a new book I am proud to share with luminaries Polish and Romanian.
Also my own way of unravelling Brexit.

MOUNT ABRAXAS 2017

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BEYOND THE BALCONY

by DF Lewis
Eight fictions

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Vistas of Ruin and Decay

A Ruinenlust Journey Through Weird Fiction

by Sławomir Wielhorski

This Journey features Vistas of Edgar Allan Poe, Stefan Grabinski, Ramsey Campbell, Thomas Ligotti, Eddie M. Angerhuber, Joel Lane, Wojciech Gunia and much else.

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“Life is an abandoned Amusement, a pleasure of ruins. Few are the solitary souls with a penchant for the sublime who spend their existence being irresistibly attracted to crumbling buildings and abandoned places. This book is an ode to this particular attraction – the feeling of Ruinenlust. Part fiction collection, part ensemble of essays, the volume presents a collaboration of two minds preoccupied with…

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5 Historic Hauntings: Are These the Most Frightening of All Time? You Be the Judge…

Haint-Blue Shudders

borley25The Haunting of Borley Rectory, England. Concept & Design by Woody Dexter. (Images unless otherwise noted: Pinterest)

It’s always fun to put ghost stories into Best Of categories. Well, here is a list of the “Top 5” of all time, one per century. What do you think?

Going back to the 1500s, which stories or legends of ghosts/hauntings stand out? Well, according to this list (historyextra.com), these were some pretty nasty hauntings—one in a church?!

I DO hope they were caught, trapped, exorcized…

The Top 5 Hauntings 1500-1999

scoganTitle Page to Scogan’s Scoggin’s Jests, 1666, 1866

Ghost Tale from the 16th Century

Anne Boleyn, whose headless ghost is rumoured to haunt the vicinity of the Tower of London and other locations, may be the most famous ghost of the 16th century. But instead I nominate a literary hoax ghost.

Following the Reformation, Protestant theologians dismissed ghosts as Catholic inventions, delusions and frauds…

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Vintage Horror: The Bishop from Hell & Other Stories by Marjorie Bowen, 1949

Haint-Blue Shudders

ab806fcf49d767291939a1e27d837e03Chalice of Severence by Denis Forkas Kostromitin, 2013 (Commissioned by Polish rock band Behemoth).


Marjorie Bowen was one of several pen-names that were adopted by the writer Margaret Gabrielle Vere Campbell Long (1885 — 1952). This collection of her stories is 189 pages long and contains a dozen tales of the supernatural and macabre. The book also has an Introduction written by her son Hillary Long.

Below we provide a brief synopsis of the stories collected in The Bishop of Hell & Other Stories, and follow with some information on reading the book free; as well as a bio of the author.

The Stories

d9342cf24e62b07d8b98d891dfd2dd27The Fair Hair of Ambrosine

The first story, “The Fair Hair of Ambrosine”, is set in Paris, where the central character Claude Boucher is counting down the days to the 12th of December with an increasing dread. Claude works as a clerk in The Chamber of…

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