Mark Your Calendar–My new book is coming soon! The Greatest Ghost Stories Ever Told, Vol. I…Visit my publisher and show your support with a Like and a Follow!

Here it is, friends and fellow readers and lovers of all things ghostly! News Release for my new anthology of rare  ghost stories with notes, annotations, articles, and artwork—in addition to some of the most amazing ghost stories almost lost to history!

Pleas visit Wick Press, here, and show your support with a Like and a Follow, won’t you?
Thank you, friends.
🌱SW

https://wickpressblog.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/the-greatest-ghost-stories-ever-told-in-two-volumes-ed-sanguine-woods-volume-i-eta-december-2017/

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“Laying a Ghost”—A Vintage Short Story by George Manville Fenn, from The Strand Magazine, 1891

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(theepochtimes.com)

Laying a Ghost

George Manville Fenn, 1891

First appeared in The Strand Magazine, Vol. II, No. 10, July-December, 1891.

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“It is of no use for you to talk, Mary,” I said, quite angrily; “a professional man has no right to sit still taking his patients’ fees without constantly striving after higher knowledge for their benefit.”

“Of course not, dear,” said my wife, gently—by the way, she always does speak gently—”but you study too much.”

“Nonsense!”

“Indeed, dear, but you do. Your forehead is growing full of lines, and your hair is turning quite grey.”

“All the better. People do not like young-looking doctors.”

“But you do work too hard, dear.”

“Absurd! I feel as if I must be a mere idler, Mary; and at a time, too, when it seems as if medicine was quite at a stand. Surgery has made wonderful strides, but the physician is nowhere.”

“What nonsense, dear, when everybody says that you are the cleverest doctor for fifty miles round; and at such times I feel as if I could kiss the person who said so.”

“Everybody is a goose; and, goose or no, don’t you let me catch you kissing them. There, be off, little one, and let me get on with my work.”

“Work, work, always work,” she said, with a pretty pout of the lips which invited what they received, with the result that my happy young wife went out smiling whileI sat down to think.

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“The Red Chamber”—A Victorian Ghost Story by George Manville Fenn

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Art by Jake and Dino Chapman (Pinterest).

The Red Chamber

George Manville Fenn

From Christmas Penny Readings, Original Sketches for the Season by George Manville Fenn, 1867

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“…there is not a soul living within ten miles of this place, that would not give you a long account of the horrors of the Red Chamber: of spots of blood upon the bedclothes coming down in a regular rain; noises…shrieks and groans; skeletons or transparent bodies.”

“But what an out-of-the-way place to get to,” I said, after being most cordially received by my old school fellow and his wife, one bitter night after a long ride. “But you really are glad to see me, eh?”

“Now, hold your tongue, do,” cried Ned and his wife in a breath. “You won’t get away again under a month, so don’t think it. But where we are going to put you I don’t know,” said Ned.

“Oh I can sleep anywhere, chairs, table, anything you like; only make me welcome. Fine old house this seems, but however came you to take it?”

“Got it cheap, my boy. Been shut up for twenty years. It’s haunted, and no one will live in it. But I have it full for this Christmas, at all events, and what’s more I have some potent spirits in the place too, but they are all corked down tightly, so there is no fear at present. But I say, Lilly,” cried Ned, addressing his wife, “why we shall have to go into the haunted room and give him our place.”

“That you won’t,” I said. “I came down here on purpose to take you by surprise, and to beg for a snack of dinner on Christmas-day; and now you are going to give me about the greatest treat possible, a bed in a haunted room. What kind of a ghost is it?”

“You mustn’t laugh,” said Ned, trying to appear very serious; “for there is not a soul living within ten miles of this place, that would not give you a long account of the horrors of the Red Chamber: of spots of blood upon the bedclothes coming down in a regular rain; noises; clashing of swords; shrieks and groans; skeletons or transparent bodies. Oh, my dear fellow, you needn’t grin, for it’s all gospel truth about here, and if we did not keep that room screwed up, not a servant would stay in the house.”

“Wish I could buy it and take it away,” I said.

“I wish you could, indeed,” cried Ned, cordially.

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“Reality or Delusion?”–A Victorian Ghost Story by “Johnny Ludlow” (Mrs. Henry Wood), 1868

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Art by Fred LeBlanc (Pinterest).

Reality or Delusion?

“Johnny Ludlow”, 1868*

Edited by Sanguine Woods, 2018
First appeared in The Argosy (UK) in December 1868**

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People like ghost stories at Christmas, so I’ll tell one. It is every word true. And I don’t mind confessing that for ages afterwards some of us did not care to pass the place alone at night.

We were staying at Crabb Cot. Lena had been ailing during the Autumn, and in October Mrs. Todhetley proposed to the Squire that they should remove her there for a change. Which was done.

The Worcestershire people call North Crabb a village; but one might count the houses in it, little and great, and not find four-and-twenty. South Crabb, half a mile off, is larger; but the church and school are at North Crabb. And I need not have mentioned South Crabb at all, for what there is to tell has nothing to do with it.

John Ferrar had been employed by Squire Todhetley as a kind of over-looker of the estate, or working bailiff. He had died the previous winter; leaving nothing behind him except some debts, for he was not provident, and his handsome son Daniel. Daniel Ferrar disliked work: he used to make a show of helping his father, but it came to little. Old Ferrar had not put him to any trade or particular occupation; and Daniel, who was as proud as Lucifer, would not turn to it himself. He liked to be a gentleman. All he did now was to work in his garden, and feed his fowls, ducks, rabbits, and pigeons, of which he kept a great quantity, selling them to the good houses and sending them to market.

But, as everybody said, poultry would not maintain him. Mrs. Lease, in the pretty cottage hard by, grew tired of saying it. He used to run in and out of there at will since he was a boy, and was now engaged to be married to Maria. She would have a little money, and the Leases were respected in North Crabb. People began to whisper a query as to how Ferrar got his corn for the poultry; he was not known to buy much; and he would have to go out of his house at Christmas, for the owner of it, Mr. Coney, had given him notice. Mrs. Lease, anxious about Maria’s prospects, asked him what he intended to do then, and he answered, “Make his fortune: he should begin to do it as soon as he could turn himself round.” But the time had gone on, and the turning round seemed to be as far off as ever.

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