Guess Who’s on the Cover of Rue Morgue? Yep. Laurie Strode…The Babysitter from 1978’s “Halloween”—& She’s Back …

E2C27398-E998-48A2-B822-1BEC16424956

(Rue Morgue)

Jamie Lee Curtis—-Our Favorite 70s “Scream Queen”, is reprising her role as Laurie Strode (John Carpenter’s Halloween, 1978), in the upcoming “new” sequel to the original film. The movie opens in the US on October 19th. In honor of this momentous occasion, Rue Morgue has published a sweet piece in this month’s magazine (i.e., July/Aug issue) featuring Jamie as Laurie and, well, you’ll have to read it yourself to learn the rest!

See you at the movies!!

6932F4C8-D057-4E37-BB8A-E2809DFB33FF

(Rue Morgue)

“It’s tricky, because we’ve turned strong women into superheroines, and that isn’t what makes a woman strong,” Curtis told Rue Morgue.

Well, not the ONLY thing. But going a little “Ripley” on Michael Myers’ ass…that ain’t no weakling thing. You go, Strode.

You go.

Grab your copy here:

https://rue-morgue.com/product/rue-morgue-183-jul-aug-2018/

B3684333-CD0F-45DE-B96F-B33B22A47530

 

 

Advertisements

Hardboiled Horror Stories Edited by the Very Cool Jonathan Maberry–Only $.99 ! Link in the Caption…

“Pickman’s Other Model (1929)”—A Tale of Lovecraftian Horror by Caitlín R. Kiernan

F92D57EC-4145-4488-A9AC-F9CA061F3EE3

Artwork inspired by both H. P. Lovecraft’s story “Pickman’s Model” and Kiernan’s “sequel”, “Pickman’s Other Model.” Artist unknown. (Goodreads forum).

Pickman’s Other Model (1929)

Caitlín R. Kiernan*, 2011

***

First published in Paula Guran’s 2011 Lovecraft Mythos anthology, New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird*, “Pickman’s Other Model” is a masterful continuation of H. P. Lovecraft’s original story “Pickman’s Model” that was first published in Weird Tales magazine in October 1927. [Read about the original here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickman%27s_Model
Read the original Lovecraft story here: https://thesanguinewoods.wordpress.com/2016/05/12/pickmans-model-a-story-by-h-p-lovecraft-1927/]


I have never been much for movies, preferring, instead, to take my entertainment in the theater, always favoring living actors over those flickering, garish ghosts magnified and splashed across the walls of dark and smoky rooms at twenty-four frames per second. I’ve never seemed able to get past the knowledge that the apparent motion is merely an optical illusion, a clever procession of still images streaming past my eye at such a rate of speed that I only perceive motion where none actually exists. But in the months before I finally met Vera Endecott, I found myself drawn with increasing regularity to the Boston movie houses, despite this long-standing reservation.

I had been shocked to my core by Thurber’s suicide, though, with the unavailing curse of hindsight, it’s something I should certainly have had the presence of mind to have seen coming. Thurber was an infantryman during the war—La Guerre pour la Civilisation, as he so often called it. He was at the Battle of Saint Mihiel when Pershing failed in his campaign to seize Metz from the Germans, and he survived only to see the atrocities at the Battle of the Argonne Forest less than two weeks later. When he returned home from France early in 1919, Thurber was hardly more than a fading, nervous echo of the man I’d first met during our college years at the Rhode Island School of Design, and, on those increasingly rare occasions when we met and spoke, more often than not our conversations turned from painting and sculpture and matters of aesthetics to the things he’d seen in the muddy trenches and ruined cities of Europe.

And then there was his dogged fascination with that sick bastard Richard Upton Pickman, an obsession that would lead quickly to what I took to be no less than a sort of psychoneurotic fixation on the man and the blasphemies he committed to canvas. When, two years ago, Pickman vanished from the squalor of his North End “studio,” never to be seen again, this fixation only worsened, until Thurber finally came to me with an incredible, nightmarish tale which, at the time, I could only dismiss as the ravings of a mind left unhinged by the bloodshed and madness and countless wartime horrors he’d witnessed along the banks of the Meuse River and then in the wilds of the Argonne Forest.

But I am not the man I was then, that evening we sat together in a dingy tavern near Faneuil Hall (I don’t recall the name of the place, as it wasn’t one of my usual haunts). Even as William Thurber was changed by the war and by whatever it is he may have experienced in the company of Pickman, so too have I been changed, and changed utterly, first by Thurber’s sudden death at his own hands and then by a film actress named Vera Endecott. I do not believe that I have yet lost possession of my mental faculties, and if asked, I would attest before a judge of law that my mind remains sound, if quite shaken. But I cannot now see the world around me the way I once did, for having beheld certain things there can be no return to the unprofaned state of innocence or grace that prevailed before those sights. There can be no return to the sacred cradle of Eden, for the gates are guarded by the flaming swords of cherubim, and the mind may not—excepting in merciful cases of shock and hysterical amnesia—simply forget the weird and dismaying revelations visited upon men and women who choose to ask forbidden questions. And I would be lying if I were to claim that I failed to comprehend, to suspect, that the path I was setting myself upon when I began my investigations following Thurber’s inquest and funeral would lead me where they have. I knew, or I knew well enough. I am not yet so degraded that I am beyond taking responsibility for my own actions and the consequences of those actions.

Continue reading

Black Wings of Cthulhu–An Incredible Anthology of “Lovecraftian” Horror Stories! Collected by Lovecraft Scholar S. T. Joshi… Here Are the Covers and TOCs for All Six Vols.!

Black Wings of Cthulhu: Tales of Lovecraftian Horror

80C707BA-B805-4D54-88C7-2B397207ADFBTable of Contents
ix • Introduction (Black Wings) • essay by S. T. Joshi
5 • Pickman’s Other Model (1929) • (2008) • novelette by Caitlín R. Kiernan
34 • Desert Dreams • (2010) • short story by Donald R. Burleson
46 • Engravings • short story by Joseph S. Pulver, Sr.
56 • Copping Squid • (2009) • novelette by Michael Shea
78 • Passing Spirits • short story by Sam Gafford
97 • The Broadsword • [The Children of Old Leech] • novella by Laird Barron
142 • Usurped • novelette by William Browning Spencer
163 • Denker’s Book • short story by David J. Schow
172 • Inhabitants of Wraithwood • [Cthulhu Mythos] • novelette by W. H. Pugmire
209 • The Dome • short story by Mollie L. Burleson
218 • Rotterdam • short story by Nicholas Royle
236 • Tempting Providence • novelette by Jonathan Thomas
273 • Howling in the Dark • short story by Darrell Schweitzer
286 • The Truth About Pickman • [Cthulhu Mythos] • short story by Brian Stableford
306 • Tunnels • short story by Philip Haldeman
326 • The Correspondence of Cameron Thaddeus Nash • novelette by Ramsey Campbell
355 • Violence, Child of Trust • short story by Michael Cisco
364 • Lesser Demons • novelette by Norman Partridge
392 • An Eldritch Matter • short story by Adam Niswander
400 • Substitutions • novelette by Michael Marshall Smith
421 • Susie • short story by Jason Van Hollander


Black Wings of Cthulhu 2: 18 Tales of Lovecrafian Horror

2E9CD6FD-A7BC-46C6-8346-5A82D2EEFC68Table of Contents
7 • Introduction: “Black Wings of Cthulhu 2” • (2012) • essay by S. T. Joshi
11 • When Death Wakes Me to Myself • (2012) • novelette by John Shirley
45 • View • (2012) • short story by Tom Fletcher
61 • Houndwife • (2012) • short story by Caitlín R. Kiernan
85 • King of Cat Swamp • (2012) • novelette by Jonathan Thomas
107 • Dead Media • (2012) • short story by Nick Mamatas
125 • The Abject • (2012) • short fiction by Richard Gavin
149 • Dahlias • (2012) • short story by Melanie Tem
159 • Bloom • (2012) • novelette by John Langan
195 • And the Sea Gave Up the Dead • (2012) • short story by Jason C. Eckhardt
213 • Casting Call • (2012) • short story by Don Webb
231 • The Clockwork King, the Queen of Glass, and the Man with the Hundred Knives • (2012) • short story by Darrell Schweitzer
251 • The Other Man • (2012) • short story by Nicholas Royle
263 • Waiting at the Crossroads Motel • (2012) • short story by Steve Rasnic Tem
275 • The Wilcox Remainder • (2012) • short story by Brian Evenson
291 • Correlated Discontents • (2012) • novelette by Rick Dakan
317 • The Skinless Face • (2012) • novelette by Donald Tyson
353 • The History of a Letter • (2012) • short story by Jason V Brock
369 • Appointed • (2012) • short story by Chet Williamson

Volumes 3-6 appear below following A Review of Volume 1


entry_top_03_1

A Review of Volume 1

Source: https://www.geeksofdoom.com/2012/03/20/book-review-black-wings-of-cthulhu-21-tales-of-lovecraftian-horror

Fans of H.P. Lovecraft all know about the Cthulhu Mythos and chances are even if you’re not that familiar with Lovecraft’s tales of terror, you’ve probably heard of “Cthulhu.” That’s because everybody loves Cthulhu (seriously, people love him/it!). So typically when a Lovecraft-inspired anthology is produced, the publisher will go right for more Cthulhu, not only to draw in the average reader, but also because contemporary authors can really make their mark with today’s readers if they offer up a great Cthulhu story.

While slapping a Cthulhu label on a book might be a good marketing strategy, Black Wings of Cthulhu, an anthology of 21 short stories inspired by Lovecraft’s original tales, instead encompasses a lot of aspects of Lovecraft’s writings. Don’t worry, Cthulhu and friends are surely represented and while it’s in the title, it’s not the main focus of this collection — although the big guy is front and center on the book’s gorgeous gold-etched cover.

Continue reading

Reblog: Ancient Feasting Rituals—Crucial Steps Forward in Human Civilization…

Belarus Ivan Kupala Day

Kupelo festival (Pinterest).

“The Epic of Gilgamesh” is one of the earliest texts known in the world. It’s the story of a god-king, Gilgamesh, who ruled the city of Uruk in Mesopotamia in the 3rd millennium B.C. Within its lines, the epic hints at how the ancients viewed the origins of their civilization.

A6AB568F-48C8-4A58-A037-72577B7D1087

Art inspired by the Epic of Gilgamesh (realm of history.com).

Gilgamesh’s antagonist, Enkidu, is described as a wild man, living with the beasts and eating grasses with the gazelles. But he’s seduced by a beautiful temple priestess who then offers him clothing and food, saying “Enkidu, eat bread, it is the staff of life; drink the wine, it is the custom of the land.” And so Enkidu is transformed from a naked wild beast into a “civilized” man living with other people.

Both bread and wine are products of settled society. They represent the power to control nature and create civilization, converting the wild into the tamed, the raw into the cooked – and their transformation cannot be easily done alone. The very act of transforming the wild into the civilized is a social one, requiring many people to work together.

Over the past few decades, archaeological theory has shifted toward the idea that civilization arose in different regions around the world thanks to the evolution of cooperation. Archaeologists have discovered that the consumption of food and drink in ritually prescribed times and places — known technically as feasting — is one of the cornerstones of heightened sociality and cooperation throughout human history. My own research in Peru bears this out. The data from my colleagues’ and my work provides yet another detailed case study for theorists to model the evolution of complexity in one of the rare places where a civilization independently developed.

Continue reading