Reblog: Resurrecting the Bones of the Past—the LONG Past…Will We See Huge Hairy Beasts Roaming the Earth Once Again? And, If So, Why?

4F70FD64-E224-47C4-B7B4-8618644BDD89

Photo by Scott Atwood (Flickr).

Let’s Bring the Wooly Mammoth Back from the Dead…?

“Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they never stopped to consider whether or not they should.” 

– Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) from the film Jurassic Park

Scientists say creating hybrids of the extinct beasts could fix the Arctic tundra and stop greenhouse gas emissions

If you managed to time travel back to Ice-Age Europe, you might be forgiven for thinking you had instead crash landed in some desolate part of the African savannah. But the chilly temperatures and the presence of six-ton shaggy beasts with extremely long tusks would confirm you really were in the Pleistocene epoch, otherwise known as the Ice Age. You’d be visiting the mammoth steppe, an environment that stretched from Spain across Eurasia and the Bering Strait to Canada. It was covered in grass, largely devoid of trees and populated by bison, reindeer, tigers and the eponymous “woolly” mammoth.

Unfortunately, both mammoth and most of the mammoth steppe ecosystem today have long but disappeared. But a group of geneticists from Harvard are hoping to change this by cloning living elephant cells that contain a small component of synthesised mammoth DNA. They claim that reintroducing such mammoth-like creatures to Arctic tundra environments could help stop the release of greenhouse gases from the ground and reduce future emissions as temperatures rise due to climate change. While this might sound like a far-fetched idea, scientists have actually been experimenting with something similar for over 20 years.

90AB0F00-4DBE-4668-8D0F-7B2AA25C85AA

Photo by Gabriel Casamasso.

Arctic lands are covered by areas of ground known as permafrost that have been frozen since the Pleistocene. Permafrost contains vast amounts of carbon from dead plant life that is locked away by the extremely cold temperatures. The amount of carbon in these frozen stores is estimated to be about twice as much as that currently in the atmosphere. If it thaws out, microbes will break down soil organic material to release carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere.

As a result, permafrost and the associated carbon pools have been likened to “sleeping giants” in our climate system. If they wake up, the resulting greenhouse gas emissions would raise global temperatures even further than currently projected, causing even greater global climate change (a process known as positive feedback).

Continue reading

Advertisements

What’s on the tube? The Void Works on So Many Levels. It Really Creeped Me Out… ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ …and let’s clear up some things about “cosmicism” & Lovecraftian “homages”…

42CD8DC9-9636-4D3E-9925-4DD70EA8E557

Cop: “What, so you worship the Devil, then?”
Man covered in blood, laughing: “I don’t believe in the Devil. But I believe in this.”

-from The Void

9733F498-7994-4B49-9466-6DFB61107325

These creepy, crazy-as-shit cult members terrorize a small town hospital in The Void. If you see the black triangle…it’s too late. (IMDb)

The Void is a 2016 Canadian horror film written and directed by Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie, and produced by Jonathan Bronfman and Casey Walker. It stars Aaron Poole as deputy Daniel Carter, Kenneth Welsh as Dr. Powell, Daniel Fathers as Vincent, Kathleen Munroe as Allison, and Ellen Wong as Kim. The plot follows a group of people who have been trapped in a hospital by a gathering of hooded cultists. The group soon discovers that the hospital has been inhabited by grotesque creatures. [More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Void_(2016_film)]

I don’t know about you, but THIS is the stuff of which my nightmares are made. But, let’s clarify one thing up front that the “UK Teaser Trailer” below gets wrong:

A Note on Homages

THE VOID IS NOT an homage to John Carpenter. First of all, Carpenter’s 1982 film, The Thing, is based on John W. Campbell’s 1938 novelette Who Goes There?* All three of the “Thing” films, in fact (1951, 1982, 2011**) owe a debt to Campbell’s story.

Carpenter’s film is an homage to Howard Phillips Lovecraft.*** I can’t say for sure whether Campbell had Lovecraft in mind when he wrote Who Goes There?—but it’s possible, since the story was published a year after Lovecraft’s death.

Above, left to right: Alternative film poster for John Carpenter’s The Thing (Pinterest); illustration by “ArtistMEF” for Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space” (deviantart.com); a poster concept based on Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space” (Pinterest)
*https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Goes_There%3F

**The novelette inspired the 1951 film The Thing from Another World, which historically, is pretty nifty, but it’s not Carpenter’s 1982 masterpiece:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_from_Another_World
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_(1982_film)
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_(2011_film)
***https://nerdist.com/john-carpenters-the-thing-lovecraftian-35-anniversary/

THE VOID IS an homage to H. P. Lovecraft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmicism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraftian_horror


Let’s Talk About Cosmicism…

Continue reading

Reblog: SQ Magazine, Edition 31: “Old Growth”—A Horror Story by J. Ashley Smith…

humboldt-redwood-state-park

(Photo: everywhereonce.com)


Below is a Reblog of J. Ashley Smith’s creepy story “Old Growth”, which won the 2016 Story Quest Contest. I like this guy. He’s witty. He’s easy on the eyes. And he’s a strong writer. Check out his website: http://www.spooktapes.com/.


Old Growth

J. Ashley Smith

“Look, Dad,” says Mika from the back. “Look at the faces!”

Scott adjusts the rear-view mirror. The last he checked, Mika was slumped in a chaos of Lego, two minifigures squabbling inches from his face. Now the boy is fully upright, forehead pressed to the window.

“What do you mean? What faces?”

“In the trees,” says the boy. “Bubbly heads poking out of the bark. Look, Dad, can you see?”

“What’re you talking about, retard?” Ashley is scooched way down in the passenger seat, semi-foetal with her toes on the glovebox. Scott would think she was asleep if it weren’t for the dance of thumbs over the screen of her phone.

“They’re probably galls,” says Scott. “Some trees grow them in response to bacteria, insects, that sort of thing. It’s a kind of symbiosis: the trees grow galls to protect themselves, but the galls also protect the wasps, or the greenfly or whatever, by drawing them in, growing around them.”

“Ha,” says Mika and smiles, stares out at the milky light strobing through the trees. “Galls.”

The car climbs, clings to the narrow snake of highway, winding upwards, out of the rainforest and the stop-motion fireworks of ancient tree-ferns, up into the dry alpine region and the edge of the burn zone.

Continue reading

Destinations Fit for a King…

BDBDEB65-C463-46F3-8065-299BACCF5071

(Tumblr)

My obsession w IT…

 

Derry, Maine—The Nightmare Town of Stephen King’s “IT”…in Perfect Miniature!

925EE36C-25B1-48F8-AED8-461E2074F987

Welcome to Derry, Maine! Home of Pennywise the Clown, and Stephen King’s novel, IT. This amazingly intricate diorama of a section of the fictional town was created by artist Kassiopeya Sachenwerkler.

Thank you to thechive.com, for sharing this absolutely epic diorama of Derry, Maine, USA—the haunted fictional town created by Stephen King, in which he set his novel IT, as well as parts of other stories (Dreamcatcher, Insomnia, Bag of Bones, 11/22/63–See: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry_(Stephen_King)

157C106A-CAA4-46D5-951B-F3D2988B78B9

The diorama was created within the body of a 1950s radio. The town up top, the sewer—Pennywise’s lair—down below.

The amazing piece of miniature art was created by Austrian literary artist, Kassiopeya Sachenwerkler. Fascinated by Stephen King’s IT, Sachenwerkler spent over 900 hours recreating the nostalgia and feeling of a 1950’s Derry, with clues and different pieces from the novel. Down below the streets of the town, she even recreated the sewer lair of “Pennywise” the clown that haunts the novel, the town, and its children.

All of this detail, captured in a 1958 radio cabinet! When it’s closed, it looks like a serene scene from the past. It’s only when you open the doors, that you find yourself caught in the “deadlights”.

Check out the detail on this thing in the photos below; and visit the artist: Website, Instagram & Facebook

This is some seriously stellar work!

(Photos: thechive.com)

38F393F6-4AC7-4436-B96C-E466D87DEA46

59132356-04F3-4550-B6AD-3ED398782351

D1A67922-5E39-4D0D-9DDA-8519FC2B2DED

Continue reading