Necklace w/ Pectoral Bearing Cartouche of Senusret II, Found in the Tomb of Princess Sithathor, Egypt

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Necklace with a pectoral bearing the cartouche of Senusret II (made of gold, carnelian, turquoise and lapis-lazuli) from the Tomb of Princess Sithathor, which sits next to the pyramid of king Senusret III at Dahshur. Photographer unknown (Egyptian Museum, Cairo).

The frame of this pectoral is topped by a cavetto cornice. Below, at the center of the piece, is a cartouche of Senusret II, surmounted by the hieroglyphic symbol for gods. On either side of the cartouche is a hawk, each wearing the Double Crown of Upper and Lower Egypt, and standing on a neb-symbol, meaning gold. Behind each hawk is a cobra and a sun-disc, with each cobra passing through an ankh-symbol. The pectoral is attached to a chain of gold beads, and semi-precious stones. Middle Kingdom, 12th Dynasty, ca. 1991-1803 BC.

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Three rings from King Tutankhamun’s Tomb, Egypt

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Three rings from the Tomb of Tutankhamun (ca. 1332-1323 BC). Photographer unknown (Egyptian Museum, Cairo.).

Rosette Wig Cover Found in the Tomb of the Three Foreign Wives of Thutmose III, Thebes

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Rosette wig cover (made of gold, gesso, carnelian, glass and jasper) from the Tomb of the 3 Foreign Wives of Thutmose III: Wadi Gabbanat el-Qurud, Wadi D, Thebes. Reign of Thutmose III. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1479-1425 BC. Photographer unknown (Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Vulture Collar Found in the Tomb of King Tutankhamun

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The vulture collar, the symbol of the protection of the goddess Nekhbet, patroness of Upper Egypt, from the Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62). Reign of Tutankhamun. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1332-1323 BC. Photographer unknown (Egyptian Museum, Cairo).

 

Cartouche Jewelry, Personalized…

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Personalized Cartouche Jewelry, available in Gold and Sterling Silver

Translate a name or initials into ancient Egyptian

In Egyptian hieroglyphs, a cartouche is an oval with a horizontal line at one end, indicating that the text enclosed is a royal name. Egyptians believed that one who had their name recorded somewhere would not disappear after death. The cartouche has become a symbol representing good luck and protection from evil, as a powerful amulet of protection for all eternity.